FanPost

What Scoring System is Best for Your League?


Second only to the owners who comprise a league, arguably the most important facet of a league is its scoring system.  What scoring system is best for your league? Like most significant questions, the answer is "It depends."  Fortunately, it depends on only a handful of factors which are easy to determine.  After that, customizing your league is a breeze.

Factors to consider:
1.  What is the level of participation in your league?  Casual.  Moderate.  Advanced.
2.  What aspects of hockey do you enjoy and/or value the most?  Scoring.  Defense.  Goaltending.  Grit and toughness.
3.  How much do you want your fantasy league to mirror the real NHL?

 


Level of Participation

If your league mates are casual fans, you will want to keep the # and type of scoring categories to a manageable level (say, 10) and you will want to avoid the specialty categories like FOW and Blocked Shots.  If your league mates are passionate fans, you will want to increase the number and variety of categories.

What Aspects of Hockey Do You Value the Most?
Are you all about scoring?  Scoring is the first thing the casual fan notices and it will always remain the most exciting aspect of fantasy hockey.  After all, you have to score to win.  But what about goaltending?  Should that be equally as important?  Defense?  The Top 4 blueliners are not infrequently the heart and soul of an NHL team.  How much do you value toughness and grit?  Stanley Cups are not won with a roster dominated by "figure skaters."

How Much Reality Do You Want with Your Fantasy?
Do you want the value of the players in your league to closely mirror their value in the real NHL?  Or is that less important, or not important, to you?

Once you've answered these questions, you are ready to set your league scoring categories.  Below are a few examples to help you get a feel for how to customize your league.


The Casual League
Scoring:  10 categories
Skaters:  G, A, +/-, SOG, PIMs, ATOI, and PPG
Goaltending:  Wins, GAA, and Save %
Ratio of Skater Cats to Goaltending Cats:  7 to 3 (70%)

This is a "standard" set-up, and it's good for the casual fan because of the emphasis on offense and because of the easy to understand categories.
Plus-minus is more of a team category than an individual category and casual fans have a better sense of the 30 teams than they do of the 600+ players that comprise them. 
ATOI is a good way to gain an appreciation for how much ice time matters. 
PPG is a specialized subset of time on ice.  Only the best players will get PP time. 
Goals, assists, and shots, are offensive elements to which casual fans can easily relate. 
PIMs are a fan favorite and raise awareness that there is more to the game than scoring and goaltending.  
My first league was set up like this, and I liked it a lot at that time as it was a great introduction to the game.

The ratio is 70% skating and 30% goaltending. 
By definition, this is the "standard" allocation. 
Again, this suits the casual fan as it is easy to get a grasp of the 30 NHL starting goaltenders and more challenging to begin mastering the other 600 or so skaters in the league.  As a rule of thumb, if you want to simplify your league (or if you just really value goaltending), shift more of a % of the scoring to goaltenders.

The Advanced League
Scoring:  14 categories
Skaters:  G, A, STG, SHP, PIMs, FOW, SOG, Hits, Blocks, DEF
Goaltending:  Wins, GAA, Saves, and Save %
Ratio of Skater Cats to Goaltending Cats:  10 to 4 (71%)

Plus-minus is dropped.  You want to be able to draft the best players even if that means they play for weaker teams like the Columbus Blue Jackets or the Winnipeg Jets.
ATOI is also dropped and essentially replaced with STG, SHP, and Blocks.  All scoring categories are a function of time on ice to a certain degree, but in advanced leagues it is appropriate to value production > time.  Real-time stats have made it possible to add cats like Hits and Blocks in order to value players who provide the grit and toughness essential to any winning team. 
Last, but not least, DEF is added to give defencemen their due.  Without this critical category, defencemen will be systematically undervalued.

Those are just two examples.
The variations are almost limitless.
Additionally, you could set up specialty leagues like:

The Defense League

Scoring:  10 categories
Skaters:  G, A, PIMs, FOW, Hits, Blocks, DEF
Goaltending:  Wins, GAA, and Save %
Ratio of Skater Cats to Goaltending Cats:  7 to 3 (70%)

The Scorers League
Scoring: 10 Categories.
Skaters:  G, A, PPG, SHG, SOG, Hat, GWG
Goaltending:  Wins, GAA, and Save %
Ratio of Skater Cats to Goaltending Cats:  7 to 3 (70%)

The Goon League
Scoring:  7 categories
Skaters:  G, A, PIMs, Blocks, and Hits
Goaltending:  Wins and Save %
Ratio of Skater Cats to Goaltending Cats:  5 to 2 (71%)

My personal favorite is:

The Balanced League
Scoring:  11 categories
Skaters:  G, A, STG, PIMs, FOW, Hits, Blocks, DEF
Goaltending:  Wins, GAA, and Save %
Ratio of Skater Cats to Goaltending Cats:  8 to 3 (73%)

This league provides good BALANCE between scoring, defense, grit/toughness, and goaltending, and is the best league I've been in to date at mirroring the values of real NHL-ers in fantasy play.

The balance enables each owner to select his/her strategy for assembling a winning team.  You can load up on offensive players OR defensive players OR goaltending OR grit and toughness OR some combination thereof and win the league.  No single strategy dominates.

Mirroring the values of real NHL-ers makes it more enjoyable.  There is nothing worse than owning an absolutely brilliant hockey player in real life who is not an asset to your fantasy team because the scoring system is imbalanced. 

Elite goaltenders are critical to success in the NHL and that is mirrored in this league.  Last year for example, the top 3 rated players, overall, were:  1)  Tim Thomas, 2) Roberto Luongo, and 3)  Pekka Rinne

Sidney Crosby would have been right up there had he not succumbed to injury at the halfway point of the season, and in a typical year, Alex Ovechkin would have been dominant, too.  Other top snipers, especially those who also win a lots of face-offs, sacrifice their bodies by blocking shots and/or dishing out checks like its the first of the month, etc., are appropriately well-represented in the top 25.  These include players like Corey Perry, Claude Giroux, and Jarome Iginla in addition to the "pure scorers" like Steven Stamkos

The major improvement of this scoring system, however, is the NHL's best defensemen are also represented in the Top 25.  Players like Dustin Byfuglien, Zdeno Chara, and Brent Seabrook get their due while top scorers like Lubomir Visnovsky retain their elite status.

Overall, the Top 25 in this league last year included:

Goaltenders - 7
Forwards - 9
Defencemen - 9

Now, THAT is balance!

I hope that gives you some food for thought when creating or tweaking your league's scoring system.

X
Log In Sign Up

forgot?
Log In Sign Up

Forgot password?

We'll email you a reset link.

If you signed up using a 3rd party account like Facebook or Twitter, please login with it instead.

Forgot password?

Try another email?

Almost done,

Join Fantasy Hockey Scouts

You must be a member of Fantasy Hockey Scouts to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at Fantasy Hockey Scouts. You should read them.

Join Fantasy Hockey Scouts

You must be a member of Fantasy Hockey Scouts to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at Fantasy Hockey Scouts. You should read them.

Spinner.vc97ec6e

Authenticating

Great!

Choose an available username to complete sign up.

In order to provide our users with a better overall experience, we ask for more information from Facebook when using it to login so that we can learn more about our audience and provide you with the best possible experience. We do not store specific user data and the sharing of it is not required to login with Facebook.

tracking_pixel_9355_tracker